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Chanoyu – The Art of Tea Ceremony

Tokyo National Museum

NOW CLOSED

The Essence of Japan

The new tea drinking practices of the Song Dynasty were taught to Japanese Zen monks studying in China around the 12th century and then spread among the members of Japanese high society. These people displayed their status by decorating tea rooms and serving tea with exquisite Chinese artworks called karamono. It was not until the 16th century that Sen no Rikyu perfected a new style of tea in which allowed the tea ceremony to spread from the elite to lesser lords and townspeople. This major exhibition will focus on how the arts of the tea ceremony have evolved over the centuries. This is the largest exhibition of its kind since ‘Arts of the Tea Ceremony’, which was held at Tokyo National Museum in 1980. Find out more about ‘Chanoyu‘ exhibition from the Tokyo National Museum’s website.

Preview the exhibition below | See Apollo’s Picks of the Week here

Tea bowl yuteki tenmoku type, China, Jian ware, 12th–13th century. The Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka

Tea bowl yuteki tenmoku type, China, Jian ware, 12th–13th century. The Museum of Oriental Ceramics, Osaka

Tea bowl, Shino type, known as Unohanagaki, Mino ware, 16th–17th century. Mitsui Memorial Museum, Tokyo

Tea bowl, Shino type, known as Unohanagaki, Mino ware, 16th–17th century. Mitsui Memorial Museum, Tokyo

Bronze flower vase with elephant head shaped handles, known as Kinekari, China, 14th–15th century. Sen-oku Hakuko Kan, Tokyo

Bronze flower vase with elephant head shaped handles, known as Kinenari, China, 14th–15th century. Sen-oku Hakuko Kan, Tokyo

Karamono tea leaf jar, known as Shoka, China, 13th–14th century. Tokugawa Museum of Art, Aichi

Karamono tea leaf jar, known as Shoka, China, 13th–14th century. Tokugawa Museum of Art, Aichi

Tea bowl, black Raku type, known as Mukiguri, by Chojiro, 16th century. Agency for Cultural Affairs, Government of Japan

Tea bowl, black Raku type, known as Mukiguri, by Chojiro, 16th century. Agency for Cultural Affairs, Government of Japan

Event website