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Journeys with ‘The Waste Land’

Turner Contemporary, Margate

3 Feb - 7 May 2018

From the devastation of the First World War, a new generation of writers and artists emerged. T.S. Eliot’s 1921 poem, which he worked on during a short stay in Margate, quickly became seen as one of the most important poetic works of the 20th century, and continues to be influential today. This exhibition includes works by major modern artists alongside historic pieces, contemporary works and new commissions. Artworks range from Edward Hopper’s Night Windows (1928) which echoes the poem’s evocations of people passing through the city, lonely in the crowd; to responses by international artists, such as Norway’s Vibeke Tandberg, whose installation The Waste Land (2007) breaks down and re-orders a single version of the poem. The exhibition is the culmination of a three-year project designed to radically rethink traditional curatorial processes with the help of local people.

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Night Windows (1928), Edward Hopper. © 2018. Digital image, The Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence

Night Windows (1928), Edward Hopper. Digital image: Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence © 2018 

Portrait of Space, Al Bulwayeb, near Siwa, Egypt 1937 (published in 1940), Lee Miller. © Lee Miller Archives, England 2017

Portrait of Space, Al Bulwayeb, near Siwa, Egypt 1937 (published in 1940), Lee Miller. © Lee Miller Archives, England 2017

Mask CCV (2016), John Stezaker. © John Stezaker. Courtesy The Approach, London. Photo: FXP photography

Mask CCV (2016), John Stezaker. Photo: FXP photography. © John Stezaker; courtesy The Approach, London. 

If Not, Not (1975–76), R.B. Kitaj. Courtesy National Galleries of Scotland

If Not, Not (1975–76), R.B. Kitaj. Courtesy National Galleries of Scotland

East Coker-Tse (1979), Philip Guston. © 2018. Digital image, The Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence

East Coker-Tse (1979), Philip Guston. Digital image: Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence © 2018 

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