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Tacita Dean

Various venues, London

NOW CLOSED

The collaborative series of exhibitions opens simultaneously with Tacita Dean: PORTRAIT and Tacita Dean: STILL LIFE, at the National Portrait Gallery and National Gallery respectively. Along with Tacita Dean: LANDSCAPE, opening at the Royal Academy in May, these exhibitions will explore genres traditionally associated with painting, seen through the contemporary prism of Dean’s wide-ranging artistic practice.

Tacita Dean: PORTRAIT focusses on portraiture primarily through the medium of 16mm film. This exhibition will be the first in the NPG’s history to be devoted to the medium of film, and also reveals the artist’s own longstanding and personal interest in portraiture as a genre. Meanwhile, Tacita Dean: STILL LIFE presents an innovative exploration of the genre through Dean’s lens as one of its leading contemporary practitioners. Guided by her own understanding of still life and its influence on her practice, the artist will curate a diverse selection of works, ranging from 17th-century paintings to recently completed pieces in a variety of mediums, either by the artist herself or by her contemporaries.

Find out more about Tacita Dean: PORTRAIT and Tacita Dean: STILL LIFE.

Preview the exhibitions below | See Apollo’s Picks of the Week here

Portraits, Tacita Dean

Portraits (still; 2016), Tacita Dean. Photo: Mathew Hale. © the artist; courtesy Frith Street Gallery, London and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York/Paris

Merce Cunningham performs STILLNESS, Tacita Dean

Merce Cunningham performs STILLNESS (location photograph; 2008), Tacita Dean. Six performances, six films. Photo: Mathew Hale. © the artist; courtesy Frith Street Gallery, London and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York/Paris

Prisoner Pair, Tacita Dean

Prisoner Pair (still; 2008), Tacita Dean. © the artist; courtesy Frith Street Gallery, London and Marian Goodman Gallery, New York/Paris

A Cup of Water and a Rose, Francisco de Zurbarán

A Cup of Water and a Rose (c. 1630), Francisco de Zurbarán. © The National Gallery, London