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Art Diary

Flores Mexicanas: Women in Modern Mexican Art

Dallas Museum of Art

9 April 2020

While museums around the world are shuttered due to the Covid-19 pandemic, Apollo’s usual weekly pick of exhibition openings will be replaced by a selection of digital initiatives providing virtual access to art and culture.

Alfredo Ramos Martínez worked for more than 15 years on his monumental canvas Flores Mexicanas (completed 1929): an idyll of four women in a lush floral landscape that at is at once an allegory of the four seasons and an ode to the heritage of his nation. Having languished in storage in Missouri for nearly nine decades, the painting was recently rediscovered its loan to the Dallas Museum of Art, where it forms the centrepiece of an exhibition which opened in February on representations of women in Mexican modernist art, marks only the second time it has been on public display. While the exhibition is closed, the museum has released an interactive virtual walkthrough of the exhibition, packed with text and other materials giving context to works by Martínez – including a video exploring the conservation of his Flores – and by contemporaries such as Diego Rivera and Frida Kahlo. Take the tour on the Dallas Museum of Art’s website.

Preview below | View Apollo’s Art Diary here

Flores Mexicanas (1914–29), Alfredo Ramos Martinez.

Flores Mexicanas (1914–29), Alfredo Ramos Martinez. Courtesy Dallas Museum of Art/Missouri Historical Society Collections/The Alfredo Ramos Martínez Research Project, reproduced by permission

Screenshot showing interactive materials for Alfredo Roberto Martínez’ Flores Mexicanas (1914–20).

Screenshot showing interactive materials for Alfredo Roberto Martínez’ Flores Mexicanas (1914–20). Courtesy Dallas Museum of Art

Screenshot showing installation of Rosa Rolanda’s Self-portrait (1939). Courtesy Dallas Museum of Art

Self-portrait (1939), Rosa Rolanda. Colección Andrés Blaisten, México