Apollo Magazine

Kraemer brothers among six charged in Louis XIV furniture case

Plus: Berlin State Museums return nine artefacts to Alaska | and recommended reading

A genuine commode made by André-Charles Boulle in c. 1710–20, at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York.

DP108742 A genuine commode made by André-Charles Boulle in c. 1710–20, at Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York. Photo: courtesy Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Our daily round-up of news from the art world

Kraemer brothers charged in Louis XIV furniture case | The owners of Paris’s Kraemer Gallery, Laurent and Olivier Kraemer, have been charged with organised fraud and money laundering in France, reports the Art Newspaper. The brothers are among a group of six people, including dealers and cabinetmakers, accused of being involved in the making and selling of fake pieces of Louis XIV furniture, by makers such as André-Charles Boulle. The indictments were made in January, but have only just been reported. All six deny the charges.

Berlin State Museums return nine artefacts to Alaska | Nine objects were restored last Wednesday from the collection of Berlin State Museums to indigenous Alaskan communities, reports the New York Times. The Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation, which supervises Berlin State Museums, determined that the artefacts had been unlawfully removed from burial sites in Alaska, before they entered the collection of Berlin’s Ethnographic Museum. The return of the artefacts comes shortly after the German Association of Museums and the German culture minister, Monika Grütters, published a new code of conduct for museums regarding the handling of colonial-era objects.

Recommended reading | The Paris Review features an recollection by the late Mougouch Fielding of her first encounter with the painter Arshile Gorky, who became her husband some months later. The brief memoir is an excerpt from a new book of letters and documents by and about Gorky which will be published later this monthIn Hyperallergic, Muri Assunção speaks to Wolfgang Tillmans about his recent decision to begin making electronic music again after a 30-year hiatus. And the Sunday Times suggests that Bonhams is about to be put up for sale.