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Nine art events to get to in February

6 February 2017

David Hockney
Tate Britain, London (9 February–29 May)

This major exhibition celebrates the range of Hockney’s achievements to date, from his early prints and LA pool paintings, to his depictions of the Yorkshire landscape. Organised in collaboration with the Centre Pompidou in Paris, and New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, it is a rare opportunity to look back over the British artist’s six-decade career.

Peter Getting Out Of Nick's Pool (1966), David Hockney

Peter Getting Out Of Nick’s Pool (1966), David Hockney. Photo: Richard Schmidt; © David Hockney

America after the Fall: Painting in the 1930s
Royal Academy of Arts, London (25 February–4 June)

This exhibition presents 45 paintings chronicling the economic, political and aesthetic climate in the decade after the 1929 Wall Street Crash. Grant Wood’s American Gothic has left the US for the first time, and is shown alongside works by Pollock and Hopper.

Gas (1940), Edward Hopper. Photo © 2016. Digital image, The Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence

Gas (1940), Edward Hopper. Photo © 2016. Digital image, The Museum of Modern Art, New York/Scala, Florence

The Poetry of Venetian Painting
Hamburger Kunsthalle (24 February–21 May)

Featuring around 100 works, this exhibition centres on the largely overlooked 16th-century painter Paris Bordone. His contribution to Venetian painting is examined alongside work by his contemporaries, including Il Vecchio, Lotto, and Bordone’s teacher, Titian.

Junge Dame mit Spiegel und Magd (c. 1535-40), Paris Bordone. © Hamburger Kunsthalle/bpk. Photo: Elke Walford

Junge Dame mit Spiegel und Magd (c. 1535-40), Paris Bordone. © Hamburger Kunsthalle/bpk. Photo: Elke Walford

Egon Schiele
Albertina, Vienna (22 February–18 June)

Home to one of the largest collections of Egon Schiele’s work, the Albertina commemorates the centenary of the artist’s death with this large-scale exhibition. Schiele was a pioneering force in Austrian modernism and this show traces his artistic development, from early experiments to his later celebrated figure studies.

Female Couple (1915), Egon Schiele. © Albertina, Vienna

Female Couple (1915), Egon Schiele. © Albertina, Vienna

Moody Center for the Arts
Rice University, Houston (Opening 24 February)

The $30 million creative hub, designed by Michael Maltzan Architecture, is one of the first institutions built for collaboration between the arts, sciences and humanities. Inaugural projects include events by Olafur Eliasson, Mona Hatoum, and Tokyo-based collective teamLab (pictured).

Flowers and People, Cannot be Controlled but Live Together – A Whole Year per Hour (2015), teamLab. Image courtesy Moody Center for the Arts

Flowers and People, Cannot be Controlled but Live Together – A Whole Year per Hour (2015), teamLab. Image courtesy Moody Center for the Arts

Sheer Pleasure – Frank Brangwyn and the Art of Japan
William Morris Gallery, London (4 February–14 May)

A rare opportunity to view Frank Brangwyn’s collection of Japanese art and furniture, this exhibition reveals the extent to which Japan inspired the artist.  Highlights include coloured woodblock prints by Hokusai and Kunisada (pictured).

Head of an Actor (c. 1844-64), Utagawa Kunisada. © William Morris Gallery, London Borough of Waltham Forest

Head of an Actor (c. 1844-64), Utagawa Kunisada. © William Morris Gallery, London Borough of Waltham Forest

Merce Cunningham: Common Time
Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (8 February–30 July)

This is the largest ever survey dedicated to the influential dancer and choreographer Merce Cunningham. The multidisciplinary show emphasises Cunningham’s unique artistic collaborations, featuring over 60 works by artists such as John Cage and Rauschenberg.

Merce Cunningham Dance Company performing Event for the Garden at Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, 12 September 1998. Walker Art Center Archives

Merce Cunningham Dance Company performing Event for the Garden at Minneapolis Sculpture Garden, 12 September 1998. Walker Art Center Archives

Seurat’s Circus Sideshow
Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York (17 February–29 May)

Inspired by Georges Seurat’s Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque), this thematic exhibition examines the fascination the sideshow held for other 19th-century artists – including Daumier and Picasso. More than 100 works are on display, from paintings and posters to documentary material.

Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque) (1887-88), Georges Seurat. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque) (1887-88), Georges Seurat. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

Eduardo Paolozzi
Whitechapel Gallery, London (16 February–14 May)

This retrospective – the first in 40 years – spans five decades and features more than 250 works by Eduardo Paolozzi, one of the 20th-century’s most innovative artists. Sculptures, such as the iconic Diana as an Engine (1963), are shown alongside his screenprints and collages.

Diana as an Engine I (1963-66), Eduardo Paolozzi. © Trustees of the Paolozzi Foundation, licensed by DACS

Diana as an Engine I (1963-66), Eduardo Paolozzi. © Trustees of the Paolozzi Foundation, licensed by DACS

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