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Käthe Kollwitz and her Friends

Käthe Kollwitz Museum, Berlin

NOW CLOSED

Käthe Kollwitz moved in several very different circles. She made friendships through her older siblings Konrad and Julie, during her carefree student days in Berlin and above all Munich – away from her parents and her hometown. At a young age, she had already met contacts and role models who would shape her own artistic path, among them figures that would remain loyal friends until her death. These include illustrious figures such Max Liebermann and Albert Einstein, as well as lesser-known individuals such as the Jewish collector Julius Freund, Kollwitz’s much-admired fellow student Marianne Fiedler or the patron Hermann F. Reemtsma. Artworks, letters and photographs depict their relationships and illustrate the significance of their friendships through all phases of the artist’s life. Find out more about the Käthe Kollwitz exhibition from the museum’s website.

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Portrait of Otto Nagel (1924), Käthe Kollwitz. Photo: Michael Setzpfandt, Courtesy Stiftung Stadtmuseum Berlin

Portrait of Otto Nagel (1924), Käthe Kollwitz. Photo: Michael Setzpfandt, Courtesy Stiftung Stadtmuseum Berlin

Marianne Fiedler (1889), Käthe Kollwitz. Photo: Kienzle Oberhammer

Marianne Fiedler (1889), Käthe Kollwitz. Photo: Kienzle Oberhammer

Mann und Frau (1919), Käthe Kollwitz. Photo: Kienzle Oberhammer

Mann und Frau (1919), Käthe Kollwitz. Photo: Kienzle Oberhammer

Catalogue for Käthe Kollwitz's special 50th birthday exhibition. Käthe Kollwitz Museum Berlin

Catalogue for Käthe Kollwitz’s special 50th birthday exhibition. Käthe Kollwitz Museum Berlin

Photograph of an art class taken in 1890, including Käthe Kollwitz and Marianne Fielder. Käthe Kollwitz Museum Berlin

Photograph of an art class taken in 1890, including Käthe Kollwitz and Marianne Fielder. Käthe Kollwitz Museum Berlin

Event website