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The art world responds to Brexit

Plus: Boijmans Van Beuningen Museum forced to close basement displays due to leaks | Québec City fine art museum unveils $103 million expansion | and Future Generation Art Prize calls for entries

24 June 2016

Our daily round-up of news from the art world

Brexit: the art world responds | Following the United Kingdom’s vote to leave the European Union, prominent art world figures and organisations have issued statements responding to the outcome. The market fluidity of the next few months has been a principle point of concern, with the impact of a vote for Brexit likely to affect arts funding and the art and antiques trade significantly. Reactions range from dismay to cautious optimism – but the spectre of uncertainty hangs heavy over all of them. Read our summary of the responses here. We will be updating the page throughout the day.

Boijmans Van Beuningen Museum forced to close basement displays due to leaks | Rotterdam’s Boijmans Van Beuningen Museum has been forced to evacuate exhibits from its basement displays due to adverse weather conditions, reports The Art Newspaper. The basement of the museum’s pavilion building contains archaeological artefacts and design exhibits dating from 1300 to 1900, which had to be evacuated to a higher floor after heavy rainfall and sewage threatened to seep in. The museum’s library display of rare books was also moved. There are no reports of damage to collection items.

Québec City fine art museum unveils $103 million expansion | Today will mark the opening of the Québec City museum’s major new extension, a $103 million project designed by Rem Koolhaas’s OMA partnership. The extension spans 15,000 square metres over five storeys, and is connected to the museum’s existing buildings by an underground passageway. Curatorially, the new extension will largely be devoted to the work of Québécois artists.

Future Generation Art Prize calls for entries | The Future Generation Art Prize, an open-entry global award for artists up to the age of 35, has launched a call for entries for its 2017 edition. The $100,000 prize was established in 2009 by Ukrainian businessman and philanthropist Victor Pinchuk, and has shown work by artists from more than 30 countries. The winner will be announced at a ceremony in Kiev in April.

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