Apollo Subscribe Collector Services
Rakewell

The Rake’s progress: last week in gossip

19 December 2017

Introducing Rakewell, Apollo’s wandering eye on the art world. Look out for regular posts taking a rakish perspective on art and museum stories.

Few artists are as considerate to the media as Martin Parr. Invited to a lunch interview by the Observer, the photographer chose an economical wholefood cafe in Bristol as the venue – wanting, according to writer Tim Adams, ‘to make himself a cheap date as a gesture toward troubled newspaper finances’.

*

Damien Hirst may have no time for the ‘YBA’ label (given the chance, he’d swap it for ‘Bad British Artist’), but he has even less time for other, arguably more illustrious acronyms. In an interview with the Sunday Times he reveals that he once refused what he thinks was a CBE from Buckingham Palace: ‘It was a few years ago, but I don’t think it was made public. I don’t really like that stuff. I got where I was going by myself. The letters after your name thing just feels a bit uncool.’

*

If you thought it couldn’t get any worse than the widely mocked statues of Cristiano Ronaldo unveiled in Funchal earlier this year, think again: the worst football statuary of the year can be found in Kolkata, where a 12ft-tall ‘likeness’ of Argentinian soccer legend Diego Maradona was unveiled last week…

*

Finally, in more festive news, the National Archives have served up a Christmas treat to savour – a 17th-century recipe for mince pies. These, it turns out, were an altogether meatier proposition than today’s sweet Yuletide treats.

Discovered among the papers of Edward Conway, secretary of state during the reign of Charles I, the recipe provides instructions for six mince pies of ‘indifferent biggnesse’ and requires, among other things, two pounds of butter, ‘a Loyne of fatt Mutton’, and ‘a Legg of Veale to mynce w[i]th it’. ‘When the Pyes are filled slyce Dates and stick in the top’, it counsels. Who could possibly resist?

Got a story for Rakewell? Get in touch at rakewell@apollomag.com or via @Rakewelltweets.

There’s never been a better time to subscribe to Apollo magazine. Start your subscription today with 3 issues for £10.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *