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Book end? The National Art Library at the V&A, London, photographed in 2016.

For the future of scholarship, the National Art Library must be protected

The V&A says it’s protecting the jobs of librarians (for now), but the fate of the greatest art library in the UK remains uncertain

19 Mar 2021
Left: Addie Card, 12 Years Old, Spinner in cotton mill, North Pownal, Vermont (1910), Lewis Hine. National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. Right: Digital colourisation of Lewis Hine’s photograph of Addie Card by Marina Amaral. Photo: © Marina Amaral

Does the past look better in black and white?

Photographers and film-makers have long added colour to their images – but does the current craze for colourisation create a false impression of olden times?

11 Mar 2021
Christopher Monkhouse, photographed in Pittsburgh in the 1970s

Remembering Christopher Monkhouse (1947–2021), a renowned curator for whom collecting was a way of life

Christopher Monkhouse transformed the decorative arts holdings at major museums in Providence, Minneapolis and Chicago, and built his own remarkable collections of books and drawings – and friends

4 Mar 2021
A dose of culture: Luke Jerram with his Oxford/AstraZeneca vaccine sculpture

Anti-vaxxers have been around for centuries – and artists have always been on hand to debunk their claims

There’s a healthy tradition of art to challenge vaccine sceptics – from satirical cartoons to contemporary sculptures

3 Mar 2021

In defence of the Stonehenge road tunnel

Plans to sink a dual carriageway beneath Stonehenge have been heavily criticised – but the tunnel will improve our experience of the site, writes Timothy Darvill

1 Mar 2021
Gloomy forecast: at a protest against job cuts in the culture sector in summer 2020.

Has the UK government abandoned the arts?

Former arts minister Ed Vaizey and leading culture writer Charlotte Higgins on whether the government should be doing more for the hard-hit arts sector

26 Feb 2021
Casque strength: Daft Punk performing in 2006.

Bye, Robot: a farewell to Daft Punk

Daft Punk weren’t always robots – but it’s how they’ll be remembered

26 Feb 2021
The National Gallery, closed and an empty Trafalgar Square on 24 March 2020. Photo by Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

If shops can reopen in April, why can’t museums?

Museums in England will have to wait until May to reopen but shops, gyms and libraries are set to open in April. What’s the logic in that?

22 Feb 2021
Sale of the centuries: works deaccessioned by the Brooklyn Museum (left) and the Albright-Knox Art Gallery since the relaxation of AAMD guidelines.

American museums should not be selling their art to keep the lights on

Deaccessioning rules for US museums have been relaxed to raise money for collection care – and even the Met may take advantage. It’s a slippery slope, says Thomas P. Campbell

19 Feb 2021
An ancient Egyptian mummy, Nesyamun, laid on the couch to be CT scanned at Leeds General Infirmary.

Have scientists solved a mummy murder mystery?

The latest mummy to go through a CT scanner is Seqenenre Tao II – and researchers are now convinced that he died in a grisly execution ceremony

18 Feb 2021
Here for culture? Oliver Dowden, the UK culture secretary

The culture minister should take an interest in museums – but he can’t tell them how to interpret the past

It’s no bad thing for the government to sit down with museum directors, says Charles Saumarez Smith, but imposing its own version of history is another matter

Can the Netherlands make good on its restitution promises?

The Dutch government’s pledge to return artefacts stolen from former colonies is the first step in a long process, writes Sally Price

15 Feb 2021

Thoroughly good eggs: how Fabergé became the last word in luxury

From princes to plutocrats, the super-rich have rarely had the power to resist Fabergé’s fabulous baubles

9 Feb 2021
Ralph Fiennes as the archaeologist Basil Brown in 'The Dig' (2021). Photo: LARRY HORRICKS/NETFLIX © 2021

The British government thinks archaeology doesn’t matter. It couldn’t be more wrong

Funding for archaeology has been slashed by the UK government – and it’s a moronic mistake

4 Feb 2021

Tigray’s people and their heritage urgently need protecting

Reports of atrocities in the Ethiopian region include the targeting of Tigray’s unparallelled cultural treasures

3 Feb 2021
Installation view of ‘David Bowie Is’ at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, in 2013.

Has the blockbuster exhibition had its day?

In our pandemic-stricken world, vast, crowd-pleasing exhibitions are out of the question for museums. But will sell-out shows ever return?

1 Feb 2021

Repairing the Houses of Parliament will cost so much that no one dares put a figure on it

What do decades of neglect look like? For the Houses of Parliament, a repair bill upwards of £12 billion

29 Jan 2021

In homeschooling hell? Then try packing your kids off to a virtual museum

With lockdown boredom well and truly setting in, it’s time to stick the kids – with their crayons – in front of a museum website

27 Jan 2021

There’s a soggy Stars and Stripes in the Oval Office – and it’s a perfect emblem for the task ahead

Childe Hassam’s rain-soaked flags have hung in the White House before, but next to Joe Biden’s desk they feel more fitting than ever

25 Jan 2021
Will Biden’s administration keep the arts in the picture?

The art world put its weight behind Biden. Will he repay the favour?

The new administration is better disposed to the arts, but that doesn’t mean there’ll be more federal funding

25 Jan 2021
Bronze guilt: the statue of Edward Colston being pushed into Bristol Harbour in June 2020.

Robert Jenrick wants to keep the mob at bay. So why is he leading it with a pitchfork?

The UK government’s proposal to protect every monument in sight is a kneejerk response that will have ridiculous consequences

22 Jan 2021
Selfie harm: rioters in the US Capitol rotunda on January 2021.

The invasion of the Capitol fulfilled a warning from history – and will haunt us for years to come

The inauguration of Joe Biden as president marks a new chapter, but it won’t wipe out the ugly scenes of the storming of Congress

20 Jan 2021
The Making of a Fresco Showing the Building of a City (1931), at the San Francisco Art Institute.

Can historic houses tell more stories than they have done?

All the evidence suggests that the real challenge for historic properties is to present a much fuller and more complex account of the past

4 Jan 2021